Sojourning for Freedom

Sojourning for Freedom Author Erik S. McDuffie
ISBN-10 9780822350507
Year 2011-06-27
Pages 311
Language en
Publisher Duke University Press
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Illuminates a pathbreaking black radical feminist politics forged by black women leftists active in the U.S. Communist Party between its founding in 1919 and its demise in the 1950s.

Sojourning for Freedom

Sojourning for Freedom Author Erik S. McDuffie
ISBN-10 0822350335
Year 2011-06-27
Pages 328
Language en
Publisher Duke University Press Books
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Sojourning for Freedom portrays pioneering black women activists from the early twentieth century through the 1970s, focusing on their participation in the U.S. Communist Party (CPUSA) between 1919 and 1956. Erik S. McDuffie considers how women from diverse locales and backgrounds became radicalized, joined the CPUSA, and advocated a pathbreaking politics committed to black liberation, women’s rights, decolonization, economic justice, peace, and international solidarity. McDuffie explores the lives of black left feminists, including the bohemian world traveler Louise Thompson Patterson, who wrote about the “triple exploitation” of race, gender, and class; Esther Cooper Jackson, an Alabama-based civil rights activist who chronicled the experiences of black female domestic workers; and Claudia Jones, the Trinidad-born activist who emerged as one of the Communist Party’s leading theorists of black women’s exploitation. Drawing on more than forty oral histories collected from veteran black women radicals and their family members, McDuffie examines how these women negotiated race, gender, class, sexuality, and politics within the CPUSA. In Sojourning for Freedom, he depicts a community of radical black women activist intellectuals who helped to lay the foundation for a transnational modern black feminism.

Left of Karl Marx

Left of Karl Marx Author Carole Boyce Davies
ISBN-10 9780822390329
Year 2008-01-15
Pages 344
Language en
Publisher Duke University Press
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In Left of Karl Marx, Carole Boyce Davies assesses the activism, writing, and legacy of Claudia Jones (1915–1964), a pioneering Afro-Caribbean radical intellectual, dedicated communist, and feminist. Jones is buried in London’s Highgate Cemetery, to the left of Karl Marx—a location that Boyce Davies finds fitting given how Jones expanded Marxism-Leninism to incorporate gender and race in her political critique and activism. Claudia Cumberbatch Jones was born in Trinidad. In 1924, she moved to New York, where she lived for the next thirty years. She was active in the Communist Party from her early twenties onward. A talented writer and speaker, she traveled throughout the United States lecturing and organizing. In the early 1950s, she wrote a well-known column, “Half the World,” for the Daily Worker. As the U.S. government intensified its efforts to prosecute communists, Jones was arrested several times. She served nearly a year in a U.S. prison before being deported and given asylum by Great Britain in 1955. There she founded The West Indian Gazette and Afro-Asian Caribbean News and the Caribbean Carnival, an annual London festival that continues today as the Notting Hill Carnival. Boyce Davies examines Jones’s thought and journalism, her political and community organizing, and poetry that the activist wrote while she was imprisoned. Looking at the contents of the FBI file on Jones, Boyce Davies contrasts Jones’s own narration of her life with the federal government’s. Left of Karl Marx establishes Jones as a significant figure within Caribbean intellectual traditions, black U.S. feminism, and the history of communism.

Living for the Revolution

Living for the Revolution Author Kimberly Springer
ISBN-10 9780822386858
Year 2005-04-07
Pages 240
Language en
Publisher Duke University Press
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The first in-depth analysis of the black feminist movement, Living for the Revolution fills in a crucial but overlooked chapter in African American, women’s, and social movement history. Through original oral history interviews with key activists and analysis of previously unexamined organizational records, Kimberly Springer traces the emergence, life, and decline of several black feminist organizations: the Third World Women’s Alliance, Black Women Organized for Action, the National Black Feminist Organization, the National Alliance of Black Feminists, and the Combahee River Collective. The first of these to form was founded in 1968; all five were defunct by 1980. Springer demonstrates that these organizations led the way in articulating an activist vision formed by the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality. The organizations that Springer examines were the first to explicitly use feminist theory to further the work of previous black women’s organizations. As she describes, they emerged in response to marginalization in the civil rights and women’s movements, stereotyping in popular culture, and misrepresentation in public policy. Springer compares the organizations’ ideologies, goals, activities, memberships, leadership styles, finances, and communication strategies. Reflecting on the conflicts, lack of resources, and burnout that led to the demise of these groups, she considers the future of black feminist organizing, particularly at the national level. Living for the Revolution is an essential reference: it provides the history of a movement that influenced black feminist theory and civil rights activism for decades to come.

Strike a Woman Strike a Rock

Strike a Woman  Strike a Rock Author Barbara Hutmacher MacLean
ISBN-10 1592210767
Year 2004
Pages 339
Language en
Publisher Africa World Press
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A trenchant and compelling book that reveals a cross-section of South African women who have been part of the courageous struggle against apartheid. The women talk of the past, the violent years leading to change, their roles in the new govern- ment, and their hopes for the future. These women include black women who risked death and torture by opposing the government's racial laws and white women who openly protested the same policies which gave them privilege, and as they speak about their fight for freedom it is apparent that South Africa would not have evolved as it has without them.

We Will Shoot Back

We Will Shoot Back Author Akinyele Omowale Umoja
ISBN-10 9780814725245
Year 2013-04-22
Pages 351
Language en
Publisher NYU Press
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"Ranging from Reconstruction to the Black Power period, this thoroughly and creatively researched book effectively challenges long-held beliefs about the Black Freedom Struggle. It should make it abundantly clear that the violence/nonviolence dichotomy is too simple to capture the thinking of Black Southerners about the forms of effective resistance."—Charles M. Payne, University of Chicago The notion that the civil rights movement in the southern United States was a nonviolent movement remains a dominant theme of civil rights memory and representation in popular culture. Yet in dozens of southern communities, Black people picked up arms to defend their leaders, communities, and lives. In particular, Black people relied on armed self-defense in communities where federal government officials failed to safeguard activists and supporters from the violence of racists and segregationists, who were often supported by local law enforcement. In We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement, Akinyele Omowale Umoja argues that armed resistance was critical to the efficacy of the southern freedom struggle and the dismantling of segregation and Black disenfranchisement. Intimidation and fear were central to the system of oppression in Mississippi and most of the Deep South. To overcome the system of segregation, Black people had to overcome fear to present a significant challenge to White domination. Armed self-defense was a major tool of survival in allowing some Black southern communities to maintain their integrity and existence in the face of White supremacist terror. By 1965, armed resistance, particularly self-defense, was a significant factor in the challenge of the descendants of enslaved Africans to overturning fear and intimidation and developing different political and social relationships between Black and White Mississippians. This riveting historical narrative relies upon oral history, archival material, and scholarly literature to reconstruct the use of armed resistance by Black activists and supporters in Mississippi to challenge racist terrorism, segregation, and fight for human rights and political empowerment from the early 1950s through the late 1970s. Akinyele Omowale Umoja is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of African-American Studies at Georgia State University, where he teaches courses on the history of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and other social movements.

Hands on the Freedom Plow

Hands on the Freedom Plow Author Faith S. Holsaert
ISBN-10 9780252035579
Year 2010
Pages 616
Language en
Publisher University of Illinois Press
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Fifty-two women - northern and southern, young and old, urban and rural, black, white, and Latina - share their courageous personal stories of working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement. The testimonies cover early sit-ins, voter registration campaigns, and Freedom Rides; the 1963 March on Washington, the Mississippi Freedom Summer, and the Movements in Alabama and Maryland; Black Power and anti-war activism. --publisher's description.

Radical Moves

Radical Moves Author Lara Putnam
ISBN-10 9780807838136
Year 2013-01-07
Pages 336
Language en
Publisher UNC Press Books
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In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing," writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.

The Red Virgin and the Vision of Utopia

The Red Virgin and the Vision of Utopia Author Mary M. Talbot
ISBN-10 9781630086978
Year 2016-06-14
Pages 135
Language en
Publisher Dark Horse Comics
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From acclaimed writer Mary M. Talbot and graphic-novel pioneer Bryan Talbot comes The Red Virgin and the Vision of Utopia, a portrait of revolutionary feminist Louise Michel, who took up arms against a French regime that executed thousands. Deported to a penal colony, Michel joined the cause of the indigenous population against colonial oppression. * Mary M. Talbot, writer of Dotter of Her Father's Eyes and Sally heathcote Suffragette is a scholar of international acclaim who has published widely on language, gender, and power, particularly in relation to media and consumer culture. * Artist Bryan Talbot is one of the pioneers of the graphic novel, whose works include The Adventures of Luther Arkwright, The Tale of One Bad Rat, Alice in Sunderland, and the Grandvilleseries.

Lynch Law in Georgia

Lynch Law in Georgia Author Ida B. Wells-Barnett
ISBN-10 LCCN:91898209
Year 1899
Pages 18
Language en
Publisher
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Accounts of nine lynchings as recorded in two major Georgia newspapers as a commentary on southern white racism, together with results of a private investigation of the incidents to ascertain the facts. Wells-Barnett hoped to use this information in an appeal to stop such lawlessness.

Beyond Containment

Beyond Containment Author Claudia Jones
ISBN-10 095624016X
Year 2011
Pages 241
Language en
Publisher Ayebia Clarke Pub Limited
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Claudia Jones was a smart, politically wise, brilliant, transnational feminist, Pan African theorist and cultural activist who initiated political ideas and strategies that are now seen as a necessary way of intersecting a variety of political fields and positions. Known as the founder of the first London carnival and the editor of the first black newspaper, her activism bridged the black world politics of decolonisation and contemporary community empowerment. For the first time, her essays, poetry and writings are here brought together.

Black Internationalist Feminism

Black Internationalist Feminism Author Cheryl Higashida
ISBN-10 0252093542
Year 2011-12-01
Pages 264
Language en
Publisher University of Illinois Press
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Black Internationalist Feminism examines how African American women writers affiliated themselves with the post-World War II Black Communist Left and developed a distinct strand of feminism. This vital yet largely overlooked feminist tradition built upon and critically retheorized the postwar Left's "nationalist internationalism," which connected the liberation of Blacks in the United States to the liberation of Third World nations and the worldwide proletariat. Black internationalist feminism critiques racist, heteronormative, and masculinist articulations of nationalism while maintaining the importance of national liberation movements for achieving Black women's social, political, and economic rights. Cheryl Higashida shows how Claudia Jones, Lorraine Hansberry, Alice Childress, Rosa Guy, Audre Lorde, and Maya Angelou worked within and against established literary forms to demonstrate that nationalist internationalism was linked to struggles against heterosexism and patriarchy. Exploring a diverse range of plays, novels, essays, poetry, and reportage, Higashida illustrates how literature is a crucial lens for studying Black internationalist feminism because these authors were at the forefront of bringing the perspectives and problems of black women to light against their marginalization and silencing. In examining writing by Black Left women from 1945–1995, Black Internationalist Feminism contributes to recent efforts to rehistoricize the Old Left, Civil Rights, Black Power, and second-wave Black women's movements.

Anti racism

Anti racism Author Alastair Bonnett
ISBN-10 0415171202
Year 2000-01
Pages 193
Language en
Publisher Psychology Press
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Anti-Racism is an introductory text, based on source material from around the world, that explains the roots and describes the practice of anti-racism in Western and non-Western societies from Britain and the USA to Malaysia and Peru.

From Black Power to Hip Hop

From Black Power to Hip Hop Author Patricia Hill Collins
ISBN-10 1592137903
Year 2006-01-19
Pages 256
Language en
Publisher Temple University Press
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A provocative analysis of the new contours of black nationalism and feminism in America.

The Age of Garvey

The Age of Garvey Author Adam Ewing
ISBN-10 9781400852444
Year 2014-08-24
Pages 320
Language en
Publisher Princeton University Press
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Jamaican activist Marcus Garvey (1887–1940) organized the Universal Negro Improvement Association in Harlem in 1917. By the early 1920s, his program of African liberation and racial uplift had attracted millions of supporters, both in the United States and abroad. The Age of Garvey presents an expansive global history of the movement that came to be known as Garveyism. Offering a groundbreaking new interpretation of global black politics between the First and Second World Wars, Adam Ewing charts Garveyism's emergence, its remarkable global transmission, and its influence in the responses among African descendants to white supremacy and colonial rule in Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. Delving into the organizing work and political approach of Garvey and his followers, Ewing shows that Garveyism emerged from a rich tradition of pan-African politics that had established, by the First World War, lines of communication among black intellectuals on both sides of the Atlantic. Garvey’s legacy was to reengineer this tradition as a vibrant and multifaceted mass politics. Ewing looks at the people who enabled Garveyism’s global spread, including labor activists in the Caribbean and Central America, community organizers in the urban and rural United States, millennial religious revivalists in central and southern Africa, welfare associations and independent church activists in Malawi and Zambia, and an emerging generation of Kikuyu leadership in central Kenya. Moving away from the images of quixotic business schemes and repatriation efforts, The Age of Garvey demonstrates the consequences of Garveyism’s international presence and provides a dynamic and unified framework for understanding the movement, during the interwar years and beyond.